Outbreak

The cold and dark sewers keep me well hidden from the giant monstrous footsteps above. My well-worn, tattered clothes keep me just warm enough to survive on this terrorised planet. I hear the deafening cries of a survivor possibly being turned into one of those monsters. I discuss with myself whether or not to go up there and save the survivor and reveal my position or stay down here in the cold wet sewers and let the survivor turn into one of those devils. It’s hard deciding what to do in this terrible position.
Just then I hear the unmistakable deep, low growl of the monsters. I turn the radio to low volume and tune it for a few moments. Just as I was about to give up trying, I tune the radio a bit more anti-clockwise and I hear the voice of military outpost #4’s reporter:
“144 hours post-apocalypse bombing squad Charlie will drop a nuke on the Highlands. I repeat 144 hours post-apocalypse bombing squad Charlie will drop a nuke on the Highlands, over.”
What!?
I put my headset on and speak into the microphone:
“No, you can’t do this, there are still survivors out in the Highlands! Please!” I get no response. “Please, I beg of you, please cancel the nuke!” Still nothing.
“Darn it,” I mutter under my breath, still uneasy that the military would do such a cruel and harmful thing. I have to stop that nuke. Whatever it takes I absolutely have to stop that nuke and save everybody out in the Highlands. I start packing my canned food and well-worn clothes into my patched-up backpack right away for the journey up ahead to military command centre where I can hopefully stop the nuke drop. I start climbing the ladder. When I get to the top, I use the crowbar in my backpack to lever the lid of the sewers and push it to the side. I pull myself up from the cold and dark sewers, where I’ve been surrounded by the devils. I pull my crowbar above my head, ready to fight.
Like hell, this’ll be one hell of a fight. Literally.
But hey, can’t we all just have a little bit of fun every once in a while? It’ll take me two hours to walk there. If I use my bike, I’d be able to get there in half an hour, but it will attract more attention. I choose to use the bike as I’m in a hurry to stop the nuke. I get there in thirty minutes, just as I had suspected. I get off the bike, and I go cautiously into the command centre. I open the creaky wooden door only to find that the command centre has been abandoned. I look at the mountains through the stained-glass window. I see the aeroplane with the nuke in it. I have my last prayers. I see the aeroplane drop the nuke. The nuke falls through the air.
It lands.
“BOOM.”

FOLLOW US


Free Delivery on all Books at the Book Depository